The Misguided Souls: Identity crisis in Youth

-Dilip Kumar

“You have your identity when you find out, not what you can keep your mind on, but what you can’t keep your mind off. “

                                                                   A.R Ammons

 

               self identify

 

Every person in this world has a desire to be recognized. The desire is strongest in youth. The more you age, the less you will identify with this and you will come to adjust with the perspective of the world.  99% of people turn into the common laymen by forcing ‘life’ upon themselves but the remaining 1%, with that recondite knowledge, recognize their worth and strive for their ambitions and become achievers.

Most of the youth seek an approval from others and then mould their identity according to them. That aspiration intensifies into a psychological state called as identity crisis.  We need to convince our youth that genuine popularity depends on the achievements of an individual, his/her personality and the influence that he/she creates in the society.

But the lives of these common people are full of emotional voids and to fill these voids, they demand attention from everyone. This desperation of our youth to be recognized by everyone around them is leading to identity crisis. This can be identified by the changing dressing pattern, lifestyle, attitude, food habits, hobbies etc. People suffer from “Inferiority complex” and/or “Superiority complex”. They don’t try to show “Self confidence” which is between both of these.

In this post modernistic era, the youth claim that ‘BRANDS’ are cool enough. To suffice this identity loss; the corporate world introduces new fashion brands, cosmetics and beauty products, mobiles and tech-gadgets. It is called culturalization. Culture is instructed by consumerism; consumerism is ensured by commercialism; commercialism commanded by capitalism- it is an unknown truth.

With the progression of this ‘complex’ in youth – the corporate companies advertise with the co-operation of the media. They say, ‘you are special, we made our awesome product for people like you’. This complex becomes a profitable mantra to the capitalistic system. The self-recognition that satiates the youth through their own content in Instagram selfies, YouTube channels and Dub-smash videos become short cuts to gain short-lived fame.

In this generation, every one of three youngsters suffers from this complex, even though they don’t realize it. You can identify if you have this complex by self-analysis; see if you are imitating celebrities in the way you live, whether you are trying to attract people to get their attention, or if you have a mental conception that you are something special and this world doesn’t understand you. If you say ‘yes’ to any of this or more; probably then you have some sort of identity crisis.

Usually it seems to be a sociological issue, even though it’s an individual problem. ‘What others think about me?’ is an idiotic question. We need to stretch and extend to the understanding of ‘be genuine and be yourself’.

A friend on Facebook posted- “I don’t know what you gain from FB but am getting some accreditation from people. Today I met a girl in a restaurant who isn’t friends with me on Facebook, but she appreciated my posts with a surprised smile.”

This is a steady example to this generation.

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